pricing - hardwood

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Dataset / Last modified by KurtHeckman on 2017/07/13 19:48
Type
Dataset
Category
vCommons
Contents
8 columns
Rating
ID
KurtHeckman.pricing - hardwood
UUID
da936a05-a0a8-11e4-a9fb-bc764e2038f2
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Columns
DatatypeRequired
DateDateNo
StoreEnumNo
CountryEnumNo
EconomyRealNo
LowRealNo
MidRealNo
HighRealNo
PremiumRealNo
Current statistics
SumAvgMinMax
Economy18.4900000000000022.31125000000000021.792.99
Low26.993.373752.364.79
Mid36.334.541253.795.79
High46.755.843754.996.99
Premium84.7299999999999910.5912499999999995.7914.6

The Hardwood Flooring Pricing table holds the history (survey) of the price of hardwood flooring in U.S. dollars surveyed from nationally advertised retailers (e.g. Lowe's and Home Depot).  The information in this table is updated periodically for the convenience of the user.  This is a consumer based survey with no information or influence provided by the retail companies outside of that provided on their web sites.  The most recent survey data:

The Hardwood Pricing data can be used in the Flooring Material Cost calculator:  CLICK HERE.

Wood flooring is any product manufactured from timber that is designed for use as flooring, either structural or aesthetic. Wood is a common choice as a flooring material due to its environmental profile, durability, and restorability. Bamboo flooring is often considered a form of wood flooring, although it is made from a grass (bamboo) rather than a timber. 

Types

Solid

Hardwood flooring

Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor. It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, and Europe which are several hundred years old to have the original solid wood floor still in use today.

Custom_Showroom.jpg Custom Showroom

Solid wood manufacturing

Solid wood flooring is milled from a single piece of timber that is kiln or air dried before sawing. Depending on the desired look of the floor, the timber can be cut in three ways: flat-sawn, quarter-sawn, and rift-sawn. The timber is cut to the desired dimensions and either packed unfinished for a site-finished installation or finished at the factory. The moisture content at time of manufacturing is carefully controlled to ensure the product doesn't warp during transport and storage.

There are a number of proprietary features for solid wood floors that are available. Many solid woods come with grooves cut into the back of the wood that run the length of each plank, often called 'absorption strips,' that are intended to reduce cupping. Solid wood floors are mostly manufactured .75 inches (19 mm) thick with a tongue-and-groove for installation.

Other wood manufacturing styles

Rotary-peel

This process involves treating the wood by boiling the log in water at a certain temperature for a certain amount of time. After preparation, the wood is peeled by a blade starting from the outside of the log and working toward the center, thus creating a wood veneer. The veneer is then pressed flat with high pressure. This style of manufacturing tends to have problems with the wood cupping or curling back to its original shape. Rotary-peeled engineered hardwoods tend to have a plywood appearance in the grain.

Sliced-peel

This process begins with the same treatment process that the rotary peel method uses. However, instead of being sliced in a rotary fashion, with this technique the wood is sliced from the log in much the same manner that lumber is sawn from a log - straight through. The veneers then go through the same manufacturing process as rotary peeled veneers. Engineered hardwood produced this way tends to have fewer problems with "face checking", and also does not have the same plywood appearance in the grain. However, the planks can tend to have edge splintering and cracking due to the fact the veneers have been submersed in water and then pressed flat.its also used flooring material

Dry solid-sawn

Instead of boiling the hardwood logs, in this process they are kept at a low humidity level and dried slowly to draw moisture from the inside of the wood cells. The logs are then sawed in the same manner as for solid hardwood planks. This style of engineered hardwood has the same look as solid hardwood, and does not have any of the potential problems of "face checking" that rotary-peel and slice-peel products have, because the product is not exposed to added moisture.

Engineered

250px-LightningVolt_Wood_Floor.jpg Wood flooring is a popular feature in many houses. Main article: Engineered wood

Engineered wood flooring is composed of two or more layers of wood in the form of a plank. The top layer (lamella) is the wood that is visible when the flooring is installed and is adhered to the core. The increased stability of engineered wood is achieved by running each layer at a 90° angle to the layer above. This stability makes it a universal product that can be installed over all types of subfloors above, below or on grade. Engineered wood is the most common type of wood flooring used globally.

There are several different categories of engineered wood flooring:

All timber wood floors are made from sawn wood and are the most common category of engineered wood flooring. They do not use rotary peeled veneer, composite wood (such as HDF), or plastic in their construction.

Veneer floors use a thin layer of wood over a core that is commonly a composite wood product.

Acrylic impregnated wood flooring uses a layer of wood that is impregnated with liquid acrylic then hardened using a proprietary process.

Laminate and vinyl floors are often confused with engineered wood floors, but are not—laminate uses an image of wood on its surface, while vinyl flooring is plastic formed to look like wood.

Reference

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_flooring